[Replay] True Confessions about Leading Groups — Starting with 11 Students and Growing From There

Event Promotion, Joint Ventures, Measuring Results, New Audio File to Support Your DIY Publicity Success No Comments

My first group program delivered with a partner enrolled 11 people.
My second group with the same partner enrolled 33 people.
The third group program delivered solo enrolled 65 people.
My fourth group program enrolled fewer people, and I had more fun.

What Works:

  • Keep focus always on growing your list. The more people who are your fans, followers, and believers, the greater the likelihood that they will enroll in your programs.
  • Become a fabulous host of content-rich teleseminars so your message can extend far and wide to more of the right people.
  • Be crystal clear about WHO your people are with great specificity so you can be strategic in inviting the right co-collaborators.
  • Host your own teleseminars or webinars.
  • Contribute to the events of the right “hubs” where your content can add real value without being in competition.
  • Foster strategic partnerships through which your partners are delighted to introduce you to their communities.
  • Give before you get. Be the kind of partner who is a joy to work with in every way, who meets and exceeds commitments, and shows up as the kind of partner YOU would love to welcome supporting your most pressing business initiatives.
  • Make your partner commissions generous enough to invite enthusiastic participation.
  • Make it easy for partners to promote you by offering a promotional packet that gives them everything they need to deliver your good news, including solo emails, Tweets, Facebook Posts, articles to showcase in their ezines/blogs, and images of your program to turn heads and invite interest.
  • Plan in advance so your partners have adequate time to plan around your event and can give you “full court press.”
  • Capture compelling testimonials on a systematic basis so your offers are packed with powerful proof.
  • Adapt this approach as your own and see how it can lend strength to your marketing and guide the right people to say YES to what you have to offer.
  • Create a compelling opt in page. And track conversions. You want at least 50% of the people who visit to opt in. If your numbers are less than that, you have to improve the look and message you share to make it an easy YES.
  • Create an equally compelling sales page for your offer.
  • Promote the call two to three times before the call with solo emails.
  • Allow sufficient time during the call to make an offer you feel is so compelling that even YOU would make the wise choice to invest.
  • 70% of your sales will happen AFTER the preview call. So you absolutely need to create and send an after-the-call email sequence to everyone who opted in to invite them to take a closer look and invite action. Tell a story with each email you send to bring about greater commitment and urgency to take action.
  • Track your sales conversions so you can set the bar higher each time you launch your program.
  • Set big goals and reach high to achieve them. Don’t set the bar too low. This takes work, and it must pay off.
  • Express thanks to your strategic partners by paying them on time and with great appreciation.
  • Consider turning your live group program into a digital information product so you have “an irresistible down sell” to offer for those who can’t make your live session dates.

Lessons:

  • Choose partners wisely. Make sure style, brand, message and values are well aligned.
  • If your program is truly a signature program, deliver it solo with guest experts as opposed to delivering it jointly. Why? Because when it comes time for folks to make a decision to go deeper in their work, they don’t have to make an uncomfortable choice.
  • Make sure your curriculum makes crystal clear the value packed within.
  • Offer payment plans to make it easy for clients to say YES to what you offer.
  • Add a private group forum or private Facebook group so people can connect and create new relationships to support their success.
  • If your ideal client still has a “real job” consider stretching out the schedule so they can avoid that feeling of overwhelm.
  • Find fabulous partners who can offer enticing bonuses that are relevant to your offering and add remarkable value.
  • Offer a guarantee that is fair to your participants and to you.
  • Set boundaries around your availability and expectations for folks to meet deadlines for participation, homework review, etc.
  • Recognize that the journey is as important as the success destination. Keep on making improvements to your program. Keep listening for ways to serve differently and better. Tune in to your own needs and make sure the program is a fit for you and for your clients.

There is so much more to learn on this topic.  That is why I interviewed Group Training Expert Michelle Schubnel this morning about her best observations from having coaches thousands of coaches to group coaching success.

“Insider Secrets on Running Transformational Group Coaching Programs that Maximize Your Visibility, Impact, and Income” is her topic.

Access the Replay!

Title: [Private LIVE Interview] Maximize Visibility, Impact and Income with Groups – Nancy Juetten and Michelle Schubnel

NancyMichelleBlue_n

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What is your point of view about HUGE BONUS BUNDLES at the end of a big promotion?

Joint Ventures No Comments

Risky Post, but I Really Want to Start This Conversation:

>> What is your point of view about HUGE BONUS BUNDLES at the end of a big promotion?

— Do you love them as consumers who can benefit from them?
— If you get them, do you use them?
— Anything else you want to say about this?

I’ll start. I know they are persuasive because I have seem the results from some of the bigger players in the industry. And, they worry me for a variety of reasons, too.

>>I wonder if those bonus bundles serve to devalue the programs offered as bonus offers.
>>I worry that “too much information” delivered to any client at any given time is a recipe for overwhelm instead of success.
>> And I ask myself if more digital bundles and live event tickets are what is needed and wanted most of all?

What do you have to say about this? I’d really love to know!

Barb Spanjers I sometimes feel like all the bonuses are too much. There have been some programs where I never even get to the bonuses. Also, it seems like bonuses are sometimes stated as having a higher monetary value tha is plausible. Like – the bonuses are worth triple the program’s price. Seems disingenuous.

  • Joan Brooks

 

Joan Brooks I think this is a good discussion to have. It seems to me that people will expect more and more as these big bonuses become common place. They’er effective and I think there’s also the slippery slope of a “good program at a good tuition” just won’t be salable, Don’t get me wrong, I was thrilled to get a stack of bonuses when I bought Jeff Walker’s excellent PLF program at Internet Impact, and now I’ll be disappointed if I’m not offered a huge bonus stack when I buy a program,
  • Ruth Deutsch
  • Ruth Deutsch The problem with big bundles of bonuses is that the BIG GUYS who are afilliates WIN because they can give the biggest bonuses, and frankly sometimes the bonuses are as good or better than the product being sold! You’ll know what I mean if you saw Jeff Walker’s PLF (Product Launch Formula) that just finished the launch period yesterday. Lotsa people offering crazy deals that most of us can’t even compete with…
  • Barb Spanjers
  • Barb Spanjers Makes it difficult for people who are newer to the online space. It seems you have to create mega-amounts of material so you can also offer bonuses.
  • Norm Hull
  • Norm Hull Coupon mentality is being created with so many bonuses. Eventually the pool of “potential clients ” may come to recognize being added to an additional list is the long term goal. The is a chapter in the space and it will change, evolve or head in the opposite direction.
  • Meredith Poulton Eisenberg
  • Meredith Poulton Eisenberg If it makes sense with the offer. As an affiliate – I like offering something equal to the value of the commission I”m getting… for example, if someone buys LeadPages through my link – I help them set up the first one. So… if the bonus isn’t layer upon layer of crap info but actual personal help or a special class to use the product – then that makes sense.
  • Carrie Roldan
  • Carrie Roldan When thinking about a purchase, I don’t worry too much about the bonuses… I know that unless it is LIVE, it has little to no real value for me.
  • Angela Artemis
  • Angela Artemis I rarely think of the bonuses Nancy Juetten. Too many bonuses overwhelm me. I totally agree with Carrie Roldan unless it’s a live course I most likely will not make the time to do the bonus.
  • Charlotte Greenman
  • Charlotte Greenman Great question and one I am asking myself at the moment as I’m putting together my bonuses. I agree with Carrie Roldan and Angela Artemis that I don’t really worry too much about bonuses as so many are just added on to say you get something that at leSee More
    Like · Reply · 1 · 23 hrs
  • Kelly Jo Murphy
  • Kelly Jo Murphy I only like bonuses that are relevant to help the outcome of the program itself be even better. Otherwise, there is a desperate feeling of fear that “people won’t buy if I don’t throw more stuff at them” going on. People pick up on it….
    Like · Reply · 1 · 19 hrs
    • Charlotte Greenman replied · 1 Reply
  • Jason E. Rosado
  • Jason E. Rosado Great question, Nancy, and great responses! I have definitely bought some programs that I was lukewarm on, but I saw a bonus or two that I was really excited about, and bought for that, however I, too, see both the positives and negatives.

    Also, I th
    ink the biggest irony is that the affiliates by adding in bonuses end up offering more value than the program originator’s offer (total affiliate package = program + originator’s bonuses + affiliate’s bonuses), which then can drive sales away from the originator and to the affiliates. The whole construct is pretty wacky.

    That said, it’s clearly effective for increasing overall sales. I’ve wondered what would happen if there were a bonus value cap for affiliates in a given launch, then what would happen?
  • Nancy Juetten
  • Nancy Juetten I so appreciate everyone’s comments. Thanks all. Keep them coming if you are so inspired.
  • Nancy Juetten
  • Nancy Juetten I’d love to expand this conversation at my FB Fan page. Does anyone here object to that?
  • Charlotte Greenman
  • Charlotte Greenman Nope. Happy for it to go on your fan page smile emoticon may I also add that if the bonuses are way more value that the original product, that does out me off. You see products of 997 our 297 with over £10,000 of bonuses or more. To me, that doesn’t match and lSee More
  • Eli Isaac Esquire Adelson

    Eli Isaac Esquire Adelson I agree with what most of what everyone has said, actually pretty much all of it. I like bonuses that add value to the course/product/program, but it doesn’t make a lot of sense that some of the bonuses are worth more than the actual product. I don’t think bonuses devalue the product, I think it’s a way for seller to give even more value to their clients and customers. (It’s like how ‘tribe builders’ like sharing value.)

  • There is an issue with too much information, as most people have said they don’t get to the bonuses (myself included). I feel it’s because all of the bonuses are just hammered at you along with the program all at the same time and it’s too much. One of the things I like about JVIC is the bonuses are spaced out, which actually gives you time to benefit from them. If more people offered bonuses in this way it might add even more value for the client.

    Also, it seems a lot of ‘big players’ want to give back to their community and help clients build up their business (or whatever else).
    As a small player it might be best to have fewer bonuses that complement the program.
    Like · Reply · 1 · 4 hrs
  • Gayle Nowak
    Gayle Nowak Nancy Juetten, I love that you’re bringing this convo to light. Personally, I don’t find the bonus bundles all that attractive as a consumer. In Jeff Walker’s launch, Don Crowther’s bonus bundle got my attention. The rest I tuned out. Also, I still didn’t buy PLF so while I thought Don’s offer was quite sexy, it didn’t move the needle for me. Actually, now that I think of it . . . I was more excited about Don’s stuff than Jeff’s . . . and I know Jeff is the mac daddy. So, maybe that supports the idea that the bonuses can take away from the initial offer. I get the bundle concept from the JV partner standpoint, but from a consumer standpoint, I don’t have time to learn more stuff. I’d say that if you’re going to offer a bonus keep it to one thing that helps the person further implement the original offer.

 

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